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Food Day 11

cranberries and carrots

Replenish your body’s nutrient stores with these two foods. Cranberry juice provides a low calorie way of obtaining essential vitamins and nutrients and carrots are an excellent source of fiber as well as vitamin A for a healthy colon.

Cranberry Juice

Methods

  1. We recommend 100% pure juice, rather than the sweetened packaged kinds consumed after diluting with water or the cocktail blends
  2. Make your own cranberry juice using a juicer. This guarantees freshness and purity.
  3. If pure cranberry juice is not present, any form of cranberry juice (frozen, powdered etc.) is also good. Just make sure to check the labels for any harmful additives.
  4. Serve at breakfast and consume with meals for maxiumum absoprtion
  5. Instead of sugary drinks or alcohol, drink cranberry juice
  6. Fruit juice should replace the consumption of fresh fruit

Benefits

  • Boosts immunity and helps prevents cancer. Cranberry juice is high in vitamin C, a vitamin that acts as an antioxidant while also assisting the immune system.
  • Possible antibacterial and anti dental plaque properties. Certain studies have shown that cranberry juice acts against the H. Pylori bacteria that causes dental plaque and peptic ulcers however further research is needed to confirm these results.
  • Low calorie. Unsweetened cranberry juice is relatively low calorie while being an excellent source of vitamins and minerals.

Carrots

  1. Can be bought fresh, frozen, canned or even pickled
  2. Eating carrots raw or steamed provides the most nutritional value.
  3. One serving (approximately ½ cup of carrots) size of carrots provides 25 calories, 6 grams of carbohydrate, 3 grams of sugars and 1 gram of protein.
  4. Get the most nutrition out of the carrots by cooking, grinding, juicing, or proper chewing. Cooking also kills any bacteria and virus that may have infected the carrots.
  5. To get the most nutrition out of the carrot, cook the carrot in oil because some fat is required to absorb the beta carotenoids found in carrots

Eating Methods

  1. Carrots should be peeled and washed before consuming
  2. You can shred the carrots to use in coleslaw, salads, wraps or in baked goods such as in carrot cakes or carrot muffins
  3. Carrots sticks make great snacks and are frequently used in vegetable trays. Serve carrots with dips or hummus.
  4. Carrot juice is very popular because of their sweet mild flavor

Storage

  • Carrots best stored in the refrigerator in a sealed plastic bag
  • remove green tops before storing to prevent the greens from drawing out moisture and nutrients from the roots

Benefits

  • Reduce cancer and cardiovascular disease risks. Carrots contain the antioxidant, beta carotene which is converted to vitamin A during digestion. Antioxidants neutralize cancer causing oxidants in the body.
  • Vision maintenance. Vitamin A is important in maintaining the sensory cells of your eye.
  • Healthy Skin. Carrots contain vitamin E which help promote health skin

Infection prevention. The vitamin C, present in carrots help maintain the immune system while also acting as an antioxidants

Promotes health digestion. This vegetable is high in fibre which helps maintain a health colon with regular digestive habits. Fibre also helps you feel full so that you consume less sugar.

Reminder

For another source of a fibre and vitamin C, add some russet potatoes to you day.

Russet Potatoes

Directions

  1. Peel the potatoes. In addition to potato leaves being poisonous, the outer skin of the potatoes contain defence mechanisms to protect the plant.
  2. Do not eat the green spots. These green spots contain solanin, a toxin that can irritate the gastrointestinal tract. If enough is eating, vomiting and diarrhea can occur.
  3. Russet potatoes can be boiled, roasted, or mashed. They are a great source of carbohydrates for lunch
  4. For the purpose of detox, avoid adding things like, cream, cheese, and oil.

Benefits

  • Healthy digestion caused by the high fiber content of potatoes
  • Antioxidants and lower blood pressure. Antioxidants remove toxins from your blood and a lower blood pressure is associated with less damage to arteries.

Bonus Tips

Troubleshooting

Read more

Alright. You’ve made it through the first ten days – reason enough for congratulations. Yet, many who make it this far feel far from celebratory. If you’re feeling fatigued, unmotivated, or worse, you might have a condition that we call the ‘carb flu.’ The carb flu is a normal part of many individuals’ 30-day experience. It often includes a period of headaches, fatigue, cravings, light-headedness and brain fog. Don’t worry, though: here’s what’s really going on in your body.

  • Old Habits Die Hard

“If your standard diet includes large quantities of sugar and processed foods, your body is used to using unhealthy fuel for its day-to-day activities. Now that you’re cutting back on cheap carbohydrates like those found in sugary soft drinks or fast food, your body is a bit confused: it needs to find a new energy source.

  • Time to Recalibrate

Your body is so used to a regular flow of processed sugars that its become dependent on it – you’re a bit of a sugar addict. With the transition to fruits and vegetables, you’ve got a wall to smash through: withdrawal. Your body needs to learn that it can function just fine (better, actually) without the sugar.

  • A New Fuel Source

Most people experiencing the ‘carb flu’ will feel out of sorts for about three or four days as their bodies search for a new energy source. Instead of burning cheap carbohydrates, your body will draw on fat instead. That way, you’ll be using the energy stored in fat, which reduces the amount of fat sitting inert on your body. The full transition period lasts a few weeks, but by Day 14, you’ll notice a big difference in your experience. Just remember: you’re trying to make a major change for the better, and your body has a lot of work to do along the way.

Featured photo credit: thecafesucrefarine.com via google.ca

The post Food Day 11 appeared first on Lifehack.

Source: Lifestyle

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